Free Relief From a Dangerous Animal

Free Relief From a Dangerous Animal

If you play golf in areas with dangerous animals like bears, alligators, or snakes, you’re going to want to hear about Rule 16.2b. This rule allows you to take free relief from a dangerous animal, such as a mama bear and her cubs out on the course.

Under this rule, you may take a drop at the Nearest Point of Complete Relief from the dangerous animal condition, no closer to the hole. You must of course really be threatened by it. You 

Bears Crossing Golf Course

can’t just assume there are snakes in the rough, but you actually have to see them and be in danger from them in order to get free relief. 

More broadly, Rule 16 covers free relief from abnormal course conditions, which include Immovable Obstructions, Ground Under Repair, and Temporary Water. 

Read more about the relief from abnormal course conditions on USGA’s website

Rule 16 states, a dangerous animal condition exists “when a dangerous animal near a ball could cause serious injury to the player if he or she played it as it lies.”

The rule provides relief from a dangerous animal. Dangerous Animal Conditions are considered Abnormal Course Conditions. Watch the bear video below for details.

The Ultimate Girls Getaway

When's The Last Time You Went On A Girls Trip?

Since I’m a golf nut and have met so many wonderful friends who feel the same way that I do about golf, I’ve been on a lot of girls golf trips — and they’re always tons of fun. 

Of course I love sharing with you all the discounts and deals out there for golfing ladies – and here’s one you’ll want to check out. 

The LPGA Women’s Network is running the best sweepstakes I’ve ever seen.  Seriously.

If you win,  you get to customize your own Ultimate Girls Getaway for you and three friends.

You pick one of seven Dormie Network resorts and the fun begins! Meals, golf, spa… and they even give each of you an Adidas outfit! 

You get skin care products, travel accessories and your choice of a Callaway putter, golf bag or travel gear.

It’s like winning the girlfriends golf lottery! 

 

I sum it all up in this short video below…. but I think it’s kind of a no-brainer to enter, right?

There's nothing better than a girls golf getaway with your best golfing girlfriends. Read more about our Girfriends Guide to Golf Getaway!

Defined Areas of the Course

It may seem silly to describe the areas of the course in a video, especially if you have already been playing for a while. However, in 2019 the new rules of golf contain quite a few new terms. Knowing the Defined Areas of The Course will help you understand which rules apply (or don’t apply) in certain areas of the course.

Continue reading

Accidentally Move Your Ball On the Green

What was previously just a Local Rule at some courses is now an official rule in 2019. There is no penalty if you accidentally move your ball on the green. Period. Whew!

Rule 13 covers everything that happens on the putting green. Rule 13.1d says, “There is no penalty if the player, opponent or another player in stroke play accidentally moves the player’s ball or ball-marker on the putting green.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BsD4SimF6ew/

When you or another player accidentally cause your ball to move you will then replace your ball or your ball-marker on its original spot (or the estimated spot if the exact spot is unknown).  

Natural Forces Moved The Ball

Sometimes the ball gets moved by Natural Forces (wind, rain, gravity) and when that happens there are two possible actions that need to be taken.

According to Rule 13.1d,“If Natural Forces cause a player’s ball on the putting green to move, where the player must play from next depends on whether the ball had already been lifted and replaced on its original spot.”

  • Ball already lifted and replaced:  The ball must be replaced on its original spot (or an estimated spot if not known), even though it was moved by Natural Forces and not by the player, the opponent or an outside influence. 
  • Ball not already lifted and replaced: The ball must be played from its new spot.

You can think of it this way: once you lift and mark your ball with a ball-marker and replace the ball back on the green, your ball “owns that spot”. It lives there. It’s at home.  So anytime it was at home, you will need to put it back there where it lives if Natural Forces move the ball. 

Hope that makes it a bit easier to remember!

And remember, you can repair any damage to the green.

For more details on the rules, head over to usga.org.

Learn more about Repairing Marks on the Green.

Or pop over to my Instagram and let me know what other video rules breakdowns you’d like to see.

Can I Share Clubs With My Partner?

Can I share clubs with my partner in a best ball format?

I often have ladies ask me if they can share clubs with their partner in order to save time in a best ball or scramble.

I think 99% of the amateurs out there believe they can borrow a sand wedge in a pinch, since it’s a “partner” or “team” format.

Golf Rules 2019

The answer can be found in Rule 22.5.  Yes, you may share clubs in that scenario, however, the 14 club limit would be the total number of clubs you can both have together. In other words, not 14 for each of you, but 14 for both of you in this case.

And then you would exceed the 14 club limit, which would mean you would incur a penalty, which is a minimum of two strokes in Stroke Play, or deducting a hole in Match Play. (It gets a bit complicated because you must first determine when the player became aware of the breach. See page 39 of the UGSA Rules of Golf book)

So of course, the bottom line is you probably never want to share clubs!

Golf Etiquette

Do you think this means you shouldn’t be courteous and pick up a club you encounter on the course during your round?  Rule 4.1b(1) says it’s okay to put a lost club in your bag, or even accidentally have your partners’s club in your bag, as long as you don’t use it. 

For more details on the rules, head over to usga.org.